Scattered Episode 01: Introduction

This is an introduction to the podcast series. I address the question of why I’d make a podcast on scattered and scavenged remains.

  • Why knowing about scattered and scavenged remains is important
  • Why doing research on scattered and scavenged remains is important
  • How scattered and scavenged remains impact forensic cases, finding the missing person or deceased, and closing cases
  • I use the Chandra Levy case as an example to demonstrate an answer to all of this.

I reference the following in this episode:

Horwitz,S., Higham, S. & Moreno, S. (2008). “Who Killed Chandra Levy?” The Washington Post. Retrieved September 27, 2020. https://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/metro/specials/chandra/index.html

Mood Disorders Society of Canada (2019), “Quick Facts: Mental Illness & Addiction in Canada”. Mood Disorders Society of Canada. Retrieved September 27, 2020. https://mdsc.ca/docs/MDSC_Quick_Facts_4th_Edition_EN.pdf

Statistics Canada. Table 35-10-0068-01 Number, rate and percentage changes in rates of homicide victims. Retrieved September 27, 2020. https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=3510006801. DOI: https://doi.org/10.25318/3510006801-eng

Ubelaker, D.H. & DeGaglia, C.M. (2020). “The impact of scavenging: perspective from casework in forensic anthropology”. Forensic Sciences Research. DOI: 10.1080/20961790.2019.1704473.

Published by reluctantarchaeologist

I used to be an archaeologist. I guess, in a lot of ways, I still am and always was. I like to dig -- into human nature. It's dirty work, and I often don't like what I dig up. It used to be stone tools and other assorted artifacts, now it's often the truth or more questions. However, the digging is always enlightening and I always end up knowing more than when I started out.

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